I Feel Pretty! Oh, So Pretty! I Feel Pretty & Witty & Bright!

I Feel Pretty! Oh, So Pretty! I Feel Pretty & Witty & Bright!

Detroit Local Case Study #6

I don't know Rachel Lutz, indie retail queen of The Peacock Room and Frida fame, personally, but I admire her. I am also grateful to her for carrying quirky, trendy, cute dresses that fit (Some even have pockets! And, many don't require a rubber tree farm worth of spandex undergarmentry!). I admire her because she is a small business owner who markets with intention. Recently, I had occasion to study her media coverage and, in doing so, I found clear evidence of a messaging strategy. Consider this press coverage of the Peacock Room's expansion into the Fisher Building. In it you will see her branding and easily identify her key messages:

1. Branding is brilliantly reinforced by the event itself, "arriving in vintage dresses via a fleet of classic luxury cars." The lead photo is perfect. Additionally, it's masterful (and a fantastic opportunity) to align The Peacock Room brand with the old school glamor of the Fisher Building. It feels just right.

2. Key message: destination shopping is coming back to New Center. All retail boats rise with this tide. I appreciate the generosity of this messaging, from which other area retailers can benefit. Clustering entertainment, shopping, and eating is critical to attracting additional disposable dollars to the City.

3. Key message: "This is an urban planning move in addition to a retail move, with the goal to push traffic from Midtown toward the neighborhoods." Here, she's taking a clear position on the importance of neighborhoods to Detroit's revitalization--a hot topic at the center of local economic development conversations.

4. Reflecting local and national trends: Lutz has credited the success of her Frida boutique expansion with the increase in traffic brought by the QLine. And, in this article, she references the national discussion concerning the impact of Amazon on retail's demise.

Brand building requires consistency of message. Consistency of message requires discipline in developing a messaging strategy that reflects an understanding of your community, your industry, and your brand position. If you're a brand looking to develop your message, Rachel Lutz is a fantastic local case to study. In fact, she's speaking tonight at the Urban Consulate if you'd like to hear from her yourself. 

If you'd like a little marketing encouragement, consider scheduling a call. I'd love to hear from you.

(Since posting, I've had occasion to not only meet Rachel, but also work with her and hear her speak. Now that I've gotten to know her, I admire her even more.)

The Journey To Your Why

The Journey To Your Why

Move Over Mr. Wonka

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